Teaching and living in Manchester

Reasons to live in Manchester - the complete guide to moving to the city of raves and rain

As people in Manchester will tell you, they do things differently there. Spend more than a few hours in the city amongst its 2.7 million people and you’ll see just how. From its creative Northern Quarter to the world-class nightlife, to it’s booming food scene, Manchester is the city that bleeds originality. There’s no wonder why so many people are moving to live and work in the city.

Manchester has always been at the forefront of innovation — way back to when it was the world’s first industrial city. Today it’s no different. Home to the media city — where the BBC calls home— as well as one of the fastest growing startup scenes in the UK, it lives its status as THE northern powerhouse. But it’s not just tech that makes Manchester great. It is a city that is everything that is great about the north of England — it’s why some see Manchester as the capital of the North.

Whereas Manchester has almost everything that London has to offer, it doesn’t have crippling living costs. As a teacher, it’s a great place to live. House prices are less than the national average, transport links are excellent, and schools are great too. On an average teaching salary, you will have a higher standard of living than you would in London, and almost any major city in the UK.

With the peak district, lake district and the coast just a short trip away, Manchester is not just a great city itself, it offers everything you would ever want from life. If you can look past the city’s rain, moving to Manchester could well be the best move you’ll ever make.
 

Manchester schools

If you’re looking for a teaching job in Manchester schools, there are plenty of schools to choose from. With over 170 primary and secondary schools — a large number of which are in the top 5% of schools nationally — there are positions open across the city. Greater Manchester is also home to four universities — University of Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan University, the University of Salford, and the University of Bolton.
 
Young people are at the heart of Manchester’s culture. There are 99,000 students in Greater Manchester, and it really shines through in the city’s vibrant lifestyle. As a teacher in Manchester, you’ll be educating some of the greatest minds in the country. This is the city that is making a big contribution in driving the tech revolution in the UK, whilst the numbers of artists are rising every day.
 
With so many teaching opportunities on offer, if you are a talented teacher, you won’t find it hard to unlock your personal and your students potential.
  
If you'd like to view our current Manchester teaching jobs please, click here.
 

Where to live in Manchester

As the second most populous urban area in the UK, Greater Manchester has a lot of areas to choose from when you’re trying to decide where to lay down roots. Once you’ve found the right role, you’ll want to know where you should live. With such diverse options, you’ll easily find the perfect fit.
 
For some people, the cities reputation for crime is enough to swerve Manchester as a potential place to live — especially for those with families to think about. However, the city is improving, especially as more investment comes into the city. The city is safer than the city of London too. And if you choose to live in one of the areas mentioned below, you shouldn’t have any issues.
 
Manchester as a city is also incredibly affordable. From the trendy Northern Quarter and Chorlton to the family-focused Worsley and Sale, rent and sale prices still lie below the national average. And with house prices set to rise 30% by 2022, buying in Manchester right now is an amazing long-term investment.
 

Transport in Manchester

Whilst the school you teach at and the place you live are the two most important aspects to consider when moving to a new city as a teacher, the transport is also important. You’ve probably seen in the news about Northern Rail’s collapse in and around the city, but unless you choose to live far outside of the centre, this won’t affect you.
 
Manchester is actually an incredibly easy place to get around. The city’s Manchester Metrolink — every Mancunian loves to complain about it, but it’s actually reliable — transported 41.2 million people around the city last year. Cost wise, an annual ticket costs around £620 — compare that to £2,492 a year for a Zone 1-6 London Travelcard.
 
The city is also close to Manchester Airport, which flies to almost every destination across the globe. Cheshire, the Peak District, the Lake District and the sea are just a short trip from the city too. You can even get back to London in around 2 hours by train if you need to head back to the capital.
 

Sports and culture

Aside from raves and rain, Manchester is best known for its two Premier League winning football teams — Manchester City and Manchester United. As two of the most successful teams in the world, everyone in the city has an allegiance to one or the other. Whether you go for Guardiola or Mourinho, pick your team carefully!
 
Manchester is home to a number of the UK’s best art galleries. Whether you want to see the classics, fancy a gallery in a park, or want the best contemporary art, Manchester has it all to offer. The Whitworth, however, is the must-see gallery in the city, winning the Art Fund’s Museum of the Year Prize in 2015.
 
Joy Division. The Stone Roses. Oasis. What’s the common thread? Manchester. The city’s music scene is arguably the best in the UK. No-one knows quite what it is about the city that creates such consistent talent, but Manchester churns out some of the best musicians in the world. Today, the city is home to some amazing music venues — from the Warehouse Project, to open mic nights in the city’s pubs, teachers who are into music won’t just like Manchester’s music scene. They’ll be mad for it!
 

Manchester bars and restaurants

It’s not all Lancashire hotpot and Eccles cakes in Manchester. Despite the stereotypes, Manchester has got a vibrant, thriving multicultural food scene — though old-school Manchester food can be amazing as well! From the famous curry mile to Chinatown, the number of restaurants in Manchester is growing every day. Foodies won’t be disappointed when they move to Manchester — costs are lower than other cities like Edinburgh and London too.
 
From the smallest bar in Europe, to craft beer pubs with hundreds of beers stacked in their fridges, Manchester is a city that loves to get straight out of the rain, and straight into the pub. The city is also home to some of the UK’s best breweries — there are 75 in the Manchester area alone! Cloudwater Brew Co and Chorlton Brewing Co are two you need to try if you’re a true craft beer drinker. When it comes to Friday night drinks after a hard week of teaching, Manchester is the place to be.
 
Manchester is not only one of the UK’s best cities, it is the true capital of the North. As a teacher, there has never been a better time to move up to the northern powerhouse. Housing is cheap and looks set to grow, culturally Manchester is a city that rivals any other in the world, and there are a lot of opportunities to start your next teaching job in Manchester. If you are interested in finding that role right now, get in touch with one of our Manchester recruitment experts now.

How useful did you find this article?
Thank you for your feedback!
2.3 / 5.0